Crisis PR and the FIU bridge collapse: 8 ways to prepare your AEC firm for the worst

March 30, 2018

8 crisis PR tips

“By the time you hear the thunder, it’s too late to build the ark.” —Unknown

It’s everyone’s worst nightmare in the architecture, engineering and construction industry: a catastrophic incident with multiple fatalities, and your company is on the line.

That’s the reality right now for FIGG Bridge Engineers and MCM — the designer and builder, respectively, of the pedestrian bridge at Florida International University that collapsed March 15, killing six and injuring 10 others.

The focus now is on honoring the lives vendita gonfiabile percorso ad ostacoli lost, determining what led to the collapse and ultimately holding anyone negligent accountable. However, the incident is a reminder of how incredibly important it is for AEC public relations professionals to prepare to respond to such worst-case scenarios.

While every situation is unique, and the experience of a crisis PR professional is invaluable during an event, here are eight ways you can prepare now to protect your firm’s reputation as much as possible in the event the worst happens.

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3 simple ways law firms can promote litigation wins

March 19, 2018

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For litigation firms and practice groups, promoting your wins can be an uphill battle. Client confidentiality, multi-year timelines, last-minute rulings, and complex legal ideas and maneuverings make litigation promotion a unique art form.

High-profile cases require proactive media relations

Sometimes, litigation is high-profile and requires a proactive, ongoing effort to manage the public narrative as litigation unfolds. In this case, your PR team builds relationships, tells your side of the story in plain language, explains complex legal ideas and builds trust with reporters covering the story.

Not all litigation is media worthy

However, not all litigation is high-profile or media worthy. Or, clients’ concerns about confidentiality prevent any kind of public relations until a favorable outcome is obtained.

In these cases, how can law firms showcase their prowess in obtaining victories on behalf of their clients and stay top of mind with prospective clients who face similar business risks?

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How to become a legal public relations star: Be like Jack

February 6, 2018

RepInk-blog-PRstar

Becoming a trusted media source can be an incredible boon for lawyers and other professional services providers such as accountants, architects and management consultants.

The media’s third-party credibility provides nearly the same power as a personal referral — the gold standard in professional services marketing. And, when compounded over and over again (with multiple media appearances), it can even beat personal referrals.

But becoming a media star is no easy task. Yet somehow, some attorneys are always quoted and featured in top media outlets, over and over again. Take Jack, for example.

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3 newsroom lessons to improve your sales story

April 21, 2017

3 newsroom lessons to improve your sales story

Humans are natural storytellers and we gravitate to stories — whether around a campfire, the office water cooler or on Netflix. The world of sales is no different.

A compelling narrative can be the difference between a pitch that converts prospects into clients and one that falls flat. That’s why sales stories are so important.

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What to include in the perfect press release

July 28, 2016

A field trip through the 7 key elements of a great release

As a kid in grade school, the words “we’re watching a movie today” was music to my ears. Would it be another boring PBS documentary or something exciting like “Bill Nye the Science Guy?” No, even better — “The Magic School Bus.

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3 ways the Jacksonville Sheriff builds bridges with social media

May 5, 2016

3 Ways the Jacksonville Sheriff Builds Bridges With Social Media

We’ve all done it.

Dinner is simmering on the stove and, hey, I have a few minutes to kill. Let me just give social media a quick scan.

Then, before we know it we’ve watched three Tasty videos, an adorable (but worrisome) clip of dogs playing with a bear and received some life motivation from a pre-kindergartener. BAM.

Dinner burns and we find ourselves scraping burnt pasta from the bottom of our cast-iron pot, and eating Nutella out of the jar. Again.

Good content does that. It grabs ya and pulls ya in and makes ya want more.

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Don’t Give Up On Newswires Just Yet: The role they can play in your press release strategy

December 4, 2015

Don't Give Up On Newswires

Recently, Reputation Ink has been distributing client press releases left and right, and it got us thinking: are newswires worth it? Like really worth it?

In the past, the answer was a resounding ‘yes’ for most public relations professionals, and still is scivolo gonfiabile for some. Newswires were a go-to resource for distribution and SEO purposes, especially for corporate entities that had the funds to use a wire service every time they had news to distribute.

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College football marketing and public relations: Week 1 hits and misses

September 4, 2014

BradPaisley_CCDAfter five straight days of watching college football, which began with last Thursday night’s surprise rout at South Carolina by Texas A&M, I woke up Tuesday morning with Lil Jon’s “Turn Down For What” in my head…except the words I heard were “Third Down For What.” That’s because University of Tennessee, in a brilliant marketing move, spoofed the song and played it every time the other team was on third down. There was no missing it, even on television.

It got me thinking about some of the wins and misses I saw in terms of marketing, promotion and public relations in the first week of the college football season. Here, I give to you the best of the best and the worst of the worst.

The hits

University of Tennessee’s “Third Down For What”

Taking advantage of a new SEC rule this season that allows for longer periods of amplified sound between downs, Tennessee created a parody of the popular Lil Jon song, “Turn Down For What,” that played on every third down on defense. Not only has it taken me all week to get this song out of my head (and thanks to this blog, it’s back), but it did what it was intended to do: the fans in Neyland Stadium cheered at the top of their lungs on every third down and the place was electric. True home field advantage at its best. I’ve also seen interviews with several of the football student athletes this week, and they all agreed it gave them an extra boost of energy and excitement.

I do think Tennessee is missing out on an opportunity to capitalize on this stroke of marketing genius, however.

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They’re just not that into you: why journalists aren’t covering your press releases

August 21, 2014

99678588You take the time to write a compelling press release with a great email subject line to hook the journalist…and nothing happens. Journalists don’t respond to your emails or phone calls, and there’s no sign of a written piece when you search the internet. Sound familiar?

I want to take you inside the mind of a journalist. Outside of my duties at Reputation Ink, I’m a sports business reporter and analyst. As such, I receive dozens of press releases and pitches each day, much like any other journalist. Generally speaking, there’s a lot of noise and not a lot of quality pitches. I always try to keep that in mind when I’m on the other side and am the one drafting and distributing a press release for a client.

The shockingly low number of press releases that are picked up

Unfortunately, there are times when clients want to send press releases even when we’ve warned them their story might not be newsworthy. It’s understandable – when you’ve worked hard on a transaction, lawsuit, product rollout or other major project, it’s the center of your universe. It can make it hard to understand why it’s not newsworthy to others.

That’s why I thought it would be helpful to let you into the minds of journalists for a moment. The most shocking fact I can tell you is the percentage of press releases and pitches I receive that I end up writing about: five percent.

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